Looking to learn game design, need mentor

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SomeGuy12 101 Jun 07, 2013 at 18:21

I’m looking to learn game design as the title suggests, but I’m still in school. Can anyone here offer any mentoring? If you do and I ever make a game that gets profitable, I’ll send you a share of the profit.

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Reedbeta 167 Jun 07, 2013 at 22:31

@SomeGuy12

I’m looking to learn game design as the title suggests, but I’m still in school.

So start making games. The best way to learn game design is by making games. Make small, simple, stupid ones at first and then make better ones as your skills grow. No need to wait; this is something you can do on your own time with just a computer and the Internet.

Speaking of the Internet, find some game designers whose work you enjoy and read their blogs, and follow them on Twitter. Watch/read their GDC talks if they’re available online. Think about what they say and how you might apply it in your own work.
@SomeGuy12

If you do and I ever make a game that gets profitable, I’ll send you a share of the profit.

That’s not necessary and it’s not wise to offer it either. Do you really want to be beholden for the rest of your life just because someone gave you some advice once? You wouldn’t pay a share of your salary to someone who helped you get a job, would you?

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TheNut 179 Jun 08, 2013 at 15:24

Agreed with the Reed. Most people still in school would rather play games rather than make them. It takes a serious level of commitment to push yourself into working rather than playing. If you do play games, try to analyze them while you play. Ask yourself questions about how they do things and then try to figure it out. What would do you, how would you do it, and think about things like algorithms, designs, and performance implications. If you run into a snag, it’s probably because you don’t know enough about that particular domain so that’s an indicator you should go out there and learn more about it., then move onto gaming topics.

Read books and online tutorials. It’s a bit hard to believe, but there be some articles right here on teh DevMaster! Maybe even check out some open source projects. Also learn what professionals do by checking out their SDKs and level editors. Source, Unreal, Unity all have an established products with documentation, communities, and games that you can learn off. Sit down for a while and learn to use a level editor. Study how it improves productivity and think about ways you could improve it. Check out some example projects from each of those major engines and see how everything fits together. Always think for yourself and see if there are ways to improve what others have done. Never ever take what you see as the norm.
@Reed

You wouldn’t pay a share of your salary to someone to helped you get a job, would you?

You do if you got hired from a recruiter :D

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Reedbeta 167 Jun 08, 2013 at 20:57

@TheNut

You do if you got hired from a recruiter :D

Well, not quite - the company pays them a fee, but it doesn’t come out of your salary! :)

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BluePrintRandom 101 Jun 09, 2013 at 06:57

I would go to “blenderartists.org”

make a few games on your own,

the people there (including me) will answer any questions you have

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TheNut 179 Jun 09, 2013 at 16:29

@Reedbeta

Well, not quite - the company pays them a fee, but it doesn’t come out of your salary! :)

One of my former employers, I spoke about recruiting through firms and the manager told me that they do take a little out of the employee’s salary to compensate for the hire costs. There’s some negotiating variables in there, but generally the business will try to offset the costs. Usually the sum is restored on next year’s performance report and salary adjustment.