Why you should sell your video game before it's complete

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fireside 141 Mar 26, 2013 at 02:56

Noticed this article today:

http://www.businessi…-forever-2013-3

Just shows how things are changing as games avoid the middle man. This is an alpha version that is one of the most popular games on Steam. I look at some of the games that get funded on Kickstarter and I can’t believe it. They don’t look very interesting to me, but bam, they get funded with plenty to spare. I think they’d sink like a rock if they waited for release.

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Stainless 151 Mar 26, 2013 at 09:54

90% of games are sold before they are ready.

That’s why you get updates, hell sometimes they don’t even bother. The bugs become “features”

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tyree 102 Mar 26, 2013 at 16:09

autodesk does this with thier software. sell it before its anywhere close to ready and constantly roll out a ridiculous number of updates. google really laid the ground work for doing business this way. before a user would get 3 updates. when software had to be somewhere in the vicinity of complete before being shipped.

but to some degree thats a thing of the past now

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fireside 141 Mar 26, 2013 at 19:00

I think Google did make it acceptable, even though what they were giving was free. It’s different when someone is paying, but it seems to be working. I think a lot of gamers kind of like it because they get at least a small say in the final product, and the feeling that they were part of it all. Steam is capitalizing on it and it’s helping them financially. I don’t think it works for every game either. We still like to get a good finished project on a AAA title. EA just got beat up over SimCity because of server issues. They had a lot of testers, but when the full weight of the game’s popularity hit, they all shut down. Not to mention, they didn’t like the always connected form of drm, but we’ll probably have to get used to that as internet access gets more and more ubiquitous.

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TheNut 179 Mar 26, 2013 at 19:03

Stain, only 90%? I’m thinking somewhere around 100% :) Also, devs hate to use negative words like “bugs” or “issues”. It’s more like “enhancements” and “improvements”. There’s no such thing as buggy software, just misunderstood software :D

I dunno what the craze about ARMA is, but it’s one thing to ship software early, it’s another thing to make unfinished features as purchasable DLC. That’s a very shady model. What was that game that had DLC on the first day? Mass Effect 3? It’s great from a business perspective and for fans that desire more content, but there’s a right way to do it and a wrong way. You have to be really disconnected from the human race to release DLC day one.

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tyree 102 Mar 27, 2013 at 07:12

to fireside, I dont think only being able to play a game when your internet connection can be verified will hold. I dont see the majority of people accepting that. no one welcomes being monitored for any reason

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fireside 141 Mar 27, 2013 at 15:47

to fireside, I dont think only being able to play a game when your internet connection can be verified will hold. I dont see the majority of people accepting that. no one welcomes being monitored for any reason

It will be interesting to see how that plays out, but we already have something like it with cloud computing and it’s growing more popular, not less. Although it can’t be played on one computer without connection, it can be played on different computers at different times. Granted, with games, we expect them to be there no matter what as a way of passing the time. Power failures, etc, can be pretty quiet. I should know. I get quite a few during the year. I think people mostly react badly because it’s a box game, but those sales are dwindling every year.

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silkroadgame 101 Apr 12, 2013 at 08:19

They need to sold before they are ready for funds for further works.It’s an investment,and a waiting time for players who have interests.As said in the article:

If the game succeeds like its predecessors, then those licenses may become worth more than what the customer originally paid. This makes purchasers of the alpha version of “ARMA III,” in a loose but accurate sense, investors.