The Simul Sky Sequencer

2e04259fbe8eb0d81382738df916c360
0
rvkennedy 101 Aug 30, 2010 at 14:00

10-08-26-0.jpg

Description
This is a real-time image from Simul new Sky Sequencer tool.

This is our new tool for artists, technical artists and designers. The Sky Sequencer lets you plan out a real-time sequence of sky, clouds and atmospheric effects. You can then save off the sequence and load it into a game engine, simulation or one of our engine plugins.

There’s a tutorial/demo video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IpL8zh4hjQ, showing how to build a realt-time rainstorm, including properties, rain and atmospheric effects.

It’s just an alpha right now, we need people to test the tool, particularly those on the creative side. It’s part of the Weather SDK, more information at:
www.simul.co.uk/weather

and more images, including the full-size originals of the ones above, can be found at:
www.simul.co.uk/weather/media

How it works

The sequencer is an editor for our keyframer format in the SDK. In the render window you see what the sky looks like at a particular time, and you can move the camera freely. The saved sequence is a small binary file containing the keyframe data, and you can load it into any program that includes the Weather SDK, play it back, or modify it. Rendering is done via DirectX, OpenGL, or whataver API or engine the final game uses.

Obviously, for dynamic weather effects you don’t have to play back the sequence exactly, you can change it as you go based on whatever the game’s state requires. And every control that you see in the Sequencer corresponds to an API call within the SDK.

The system is being used by some upcoming games, and also by companies ranging from virtual tourism to aircraft manufacture.

More info:
enquiries@simul.co.uk

4 Replies

Please log in or register to post a reply.

6837d514b487de395be51432d9cdd078
0
TheNut 179 Aug 31, 2010 at 12:32

This is outstanding work. Your volumetric cloud generation is dead on. The fact that you have a simulator that comes with it most certainly means you guys have raised the bar. Any outdoor based game without this just isn’t worth buying anymore, hehe. I’m just thinking how the classic game Sacrifice would be with this simulator. I think it’s time for a sequel :)

On the SDK side of things, how much manipulative power do developers have? Could I apply my own physics to manipulate the clouds? For instance, could I craft my own formula to produce vortices or hurricanes?

417da4ebe698388116f7220a0ee9fbc2
0
marcgfx 101 Aug 31, 2010 at 13:20

looks great! likely a lot better live than after the youtube compression.

snow, storms/sandstorms? this will also add some extra work for a game, as you will want animated cloth/environment with such nice animated weather :)

2e04259fbe8eb0d81382738df916c360
0
rvkennedy 101 Sep 01, 2010 at 02:06

@TheNut

This is outstanding work. Your volumetric cloud generation is dead on. The fact that you have a simulator that comes with it most certainly means you guys have raised the bar. Any outdoor based game without this just isn’t worth buying anymore, hehe.

Thanks very much! We agree.
@TheNut

On the SDK side of things, how much manipulative power do developers have? Could I apply my own physics to manipulate the clouds? For instance, could I craft my own formula to produce vortices or hurricanes?

You can drive the cloud densities with a fair degree of control, though performance requirements mean it’s best to keyframe the clouds rather than control each frame. A hurricane would be a good project for somebody, you’d need some kind of vortex equation with an empty radius in the centre.

B7109317066ddd5327cb0674388c4974
0
Luz_Reyes 101 Sep 13, 2010 at 21:57

@marcgfx

snow, storms/sandstorms? this will also add some extra work for a game, as you will want animated cloth/environment with such nice animated weather :)

Animating the environment is what first popped into my mind as well. Can you have the wind and rain affect other elements in a game engine? Trees or grass on the ground move more as the wind picks up? For that matter, how 3D are these clouds? I’m imagining a flight sim where you can fly through and above the clouds, and the wind speed of the cloud affects the flight