I would like opnions

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C_er 101 Aug 24, 2010 at 02:12

Hi for all

Thanks for this site. Always helping people. I would like your help now.
I’m an advanced C++ developer, average OpenGL developer. I’m using Ogre in my work to create simulators.
I’ve acquired good knowledge in these softwares. But I want more. Much more.
Like you know, we have very good free game engines like Ogre( graphics engine ), BlendELF, Lynx and so on. And we have very good commercial game engines like C4, Unity, Shiva, with a very accessible price.
This is the point. I don’t know what direction to follow. Is a good idea to adopt one of these engines and study it or create your own?
Another thing: is a good idea to create a game using the existing free tools to acquire knowledge and after this, start to create a game engine?

People, based on you experience what do you recommend?

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Reedbeta 167 Aug 24, 2010 at 02:25

It all depends on what you want to do. If you’re interested in graphics technology and the innards of engines, then building your own engine is a great way to get experience in that area. But if you’re more interested in actually making a game, experimenting with mechanics and so on, it might be a better choice to use an existing engine that is already well-tested and feature rich, has a full toolchain, etc., as it’ll take you quite a long time to get to that stage with a self-built engine.

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alphadog 101 Aug 24, 2010 at 13:56

@C#er

is a good idea to create a game using the existing free tools to acquire knowledge and after this, start to create a game engine?

Is it a good idea for a medical student to study surgery and design the equipment used? Is it necessary for a cabinetmaker to learn how to build proper table saws? Does a race car driver have to learn mechanics?

No, no and no. :)

My point is that being a toolmaker or a tool user are two very different things, and unfortunately in game development, they are two very big “things” to do.
@C#er

People, based on you experience what do you recommend?

First, pick your poison: game building or tool building? Building a proper game framework is just as hard (if not harder) than building a game.

Once you’ve mastered one, exemplified by having completed a couple of “real” games, then start working in the other field.

Now, if you want to dabble in both fields, then grab a couple of FOSS engines and rummage about in them to your heart’s content. :)

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C_er 101 Aug 24, 2010 at 23:23

Ok, I understood.
My interest is in graphics part. Based on your replies, my tendency is to make a game using FOSS. I have some friends interested. But I very worried about graphics quality. I use Torchlight and Garshasp as basis. To get this kind of quality what do you recommend to study? And what techniques 3d modelers uses to get quality models? What can I do to help them?
What can I do to help me to acquire my objective?
Can you help again?

Thanks for previous replies

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alphadog 101 Aug 25, 2010 at 02:50

Well, the people who put Torchlight together have umpteen years of experience putting together Diablo-esque games. Also, your questions are much too broad. There are whole books that scratch at the surface of an answer to one of your questions! :)

Look, the thing is that your first 3D game (should?) will be blocks moving along a flat terrain. Don’t obsess on the “good graphics”… or, more to the point, don’t over-obsess with one aspect without also obsessing in like quantity with the others, like AI, proper physics, gameplay, etc. Because, any one person can only obsess so much, and if you spend it all on graphics, your game will suck in all other respects.

PS: You may want to read this article. It doesn’t answer your question, but I remembered a Gamasutra article on Mythos/Torchlight. Wasn’t hard to track it down:

http://www.gamasutra.com/view/feature/4123/from_the_ashes_of_mythos_the_art_.php

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C_er 101 Aug 25, 2010 at 06:02

You’re right.
I mention graphics because I like this topic. The other things that will be part are equally important.
I’ll look at the article.

Thanks for you replies guys.

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KennyW 101 Sep 06, 2010 at 03:31

@C#er

Hi for all

Thanks for this site. Always helping people. I would like your help now.
I’m an advanced C++ developer, average OpenGL developer. I’m using Ogre in my work to create simulators.
I’ve acquired good knowledge in these softwares. But I want more. Much more.
Like you know, we have very good free game engines like Ogre( graphics engine ), BlendELF, Lynx and so on. And we have very good commercial game engines like C4, Unity, Shiva, with a very accessible price.
This is the point. I don’t know what direction to follow. Is a good idea to adopt one of these engines and study it or create your own?
Another thing: is a good idea to create a game using the existing free tools to acquire knowledge and after this, start to create a game engine?

People, based on you experience what do you recommend?

I think that if you knowledgable enough and together with a team of pros, you can make some useful tools instead of competing in the already crowded game engine market.

For instance, there are two thing seemingly lacking but I think that they are in demand in the market.

1) a Terrain tools which is capable of joining adjacent terrian cells to make a much larger world. For example, Unity (or Torque?) provides a Terrain tool which draws terrain maps in the size of, say, 2km x 2km by default. By far no game engine provides tools to join these 2km x 2km small maps into a large world. Artists or scripters are left on their own to join up those maps.

And I don’t think it’s difficult to make a tool to join up the adjacent terrain map cells more smoothly, as I think that just some smart heightmap calculations and a smart UI are good enough to allow the designs to hammer or smoothen the boarders of the adjacent terrain cells.

Then I think that you can sell them as add-on tools or plug-ins for those existing game engines.

2) a 3D character generator
It is really time consuming to draw up to standard 3D character models. In MMORPG games such as WoW, and especially the recent Aion they have a built-in character creator/generator to allow players to generate their unique char toons. It should be money making to sell the character creator as a standalone package.

With such a character creator, designers no longer need to create serious models in 3Ds Max and the like, they simply run the package to generate the toons for them in a minute with the basic animations. The designers can even embed such a char generator into their games for the players to generate the toons. All they need to do is just to pay for the licence to use the package to include it into their games.