Serious Game Engine Recommendation

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Batman 101 Feb 08, 2007 at 01:35

Hello one and all.

Firstly I am an artist, and I have 2 programmers on the team. We are creating a niche FPS, nothing too fancy but we would like an engine that would suit our needs. While we are willing to work hard on an engine, it is a must that the tools are in place so the artists can really get some progress.

I would like to point out that both the programmers have used Torque, and Ogre and wish to steer clear of them for our new venture. We have another 3 coming into the team in about a month when they finish up some deadlines at work.

As an Artist I am looking for something with reliable exporters and working tool sets (Particle Editor, Terrain Editor / Level Editor, Model Viewer, Shader Editor etc). Something that we can jump in on and get working immediately.

So what are the key features of the game?

  1. Large Open Terrain (Seamless if possible, but we can programme that if we have the source.). Important to be able to place buildings on the terrain (I would assume a good scenemanager)

  2. Shader Model 3 support, with strong shader support

  3. Physics (Preferably Physx, but we can add that)

  4. Clean Code Base with good design (Hence why we want to avoid Torque)

  5. Good Toolset, where artists can just get up and running, the programmers can handle most code changes if the code base is good.

We have around $5000 to spend, but can push it to $20,000 if we all dig deep.

Your recommendations please. (Yes I have looked through the database, but there is a difference between feature lists and what an engine can actually do.)

52 Replies

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davidhelgason 101 Feb 08, 2007 at 10:31

Unity has pretty much all you need. It is being used to make several serious games at the moment

http://unity3d.com

http://unity3d.com/unity/unity-serious-games.html

http://unity3d.com/gallery/main/index.html

Specifically it probably has the best art pipeline in the business, so artists and designers can be extremely productive and actually integrate their work into the gameplay during the entire production. Unity includes PhysX and has great (and editable) shaders. Source code is not included, but you’ll find that you don’t need it, because you get a fast scripting engine (based on .NET), the ability to plug in your own DLLs, the ability to extend the editor.

http://unity3d.com/features/asset-pipeline.html

http://unity3d.com/features/shaders.html

http://unity3d.com/features/particles.html

http://unity3d.com/features/physics.html

A graphical shader builder and a terrain engine are coming up in the next major release.

It will cost you US$4500 for three Unity Pro licenses, and you might have to add a couple of thousands since the development tool runs on the Mac.

Feel free to drop me a mail me if you have further questions.

d.

(full disclosure: I’m one of the founders of the company that makes Unity)

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Peterweb 101 Feb 08, 2007 at 16:24

Torque is a great engine for serious games. No taxes, no royalties for each project… this is very important for serious games!

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davidhelgason 101 Feb 08, 2007 at 16:56

Since that was brought up, I should add that Unity also has no royalties or per-project costs.

d.

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Batman 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 00:52

But it can only be developed on a Mac (Tools wise?) and is it per seat? or per development team.

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Batman 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 01:01

@Peterweb

Torque is a great engine for serious games. No taxes, no royalties for each project… this is very important for serious games!

I’d rather not go near that evil again :P

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davidhelgason 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 01:12

@Batman

But it can only be developed on a Mac (Tools wise?) and is it per seat? or per development team.

Yes, the development tool is Mac only (though of course it can produce Windows games, and has a cross-platform browser plugin to suit). These days Macs are PCs too (being Intel based, you can run Mac OS X and Windows at the same time), so it need not be a big additional investment.

The license is per-seat (unlike most game engines, but similar to most other software), but the price mentioned above is for 3 licenses of Unity Pro. There is also a lower priced license available… just check our website for details.

Anyway, the simplest thing to do is to dive into the extensive tutorials, video tutorials, documentation and references, and of course download the demo. You just might be impressed.

d.

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Peterweb 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 04:57

@Batman

I’d rather not go near that evil again :P

Well, I don’t consider Torque the best engine, but it is a good option for serious games. It is not a good option for larger projects (AAA), but for serious games.

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Peterweb 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 04:59

@davidhelgason

Since that was brought up, I should add that Unity also has no royalties or per-project costs. d.

I know little on Unity. But for the that you explained, it can be a good option also.

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davidhelgason 101 Feb 09, 2007 at 10:22

These pages have in-game videos of serious games that are in production with Unity:

http://www.globalconflicts.eu/
http://www.wolfquest.org/

Both companies are starting up new game productions, also based on Unity.

d.

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Batman 101 Feb 15, 2007 at 01:39

Unfortunately given that it is for Mac Development only that would really set us out a little.

Anyone have any other engines?

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IPKnightly 101 Feb 16, 2007 at 06:30

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darksmaster923 101 Feb 17, 2007 at 03:42

well it depends on how much money you can spend

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lstockman 101 Feb 17, 2007 at 22:04

Two engine recommendations per your requirements:

http://unity3d.com
http://panda3d.org/

They make it seem easy to me and I’ve researched both. This is not to say that I use them, please make no mistake about that.

Another option you have is to take a graphics engine, a physics engine and create the ground level of your own gaming engine since it does appear you have a good size team to do so. This can help work out the limitations of the engines recommended and your programmers would know the code better than if they picked up another engine. This is just my two cents and nothing more. :)

Let us all know how the project comes along, maybe send a screenshot from time to time for us to drool over.

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Batman 101 Feb 19, 2007 at 01:26

I’ll look into Panda3d, Once again Unity is out of the question given the Mac Requirements.

With regards to how much I/The Team can spend :

Well between $5000 - $20,000

Obviously depends on the engine, as I would not be willing to spend money for the sake of a “Name”

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stodge 101 Feb 19, 2007 at 01:52

I don’t think Panda3D meets your needs.

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Batman 101 Feb 19, 2007 at 02:07

@stodge

I don’t think Panda3D meets your needs.

Nor do I, I’m being polite ;)

Everything is worth a look

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Liquid7800 101 Feb 19, 2007 at 05:42

Hello, first post here…
Just was curious, why do you think Panda3D is not for you? I went to their site and looked at their features etc. I am not associated with any engine out there but am an artist/ shader programmer myself and looking to begin a project (for a Maters program however) similar to yours.

Panda looked good to me but I really would like to know why you initially dont seem to like it?

As for Unity my buddy is going to use that for a game, but TOO BAD it is for Mac…sounds really good

You might have a look at NeoEngine, I was more impressed with the support and how accomodating they are. In fact their enthusiasm to help me was really refreshing and they do sport an impressive array of features associated with shaders.

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lstockman 101 Feb 20, 2007 at 20:33

@Batman

Nor do I, I’m being polite ;) Everything is worth a look

I looked at the features and the price and found that the two I recommended almost fit most of the needs. Unfortunately, as we all know, not every engine will give us what we want but thank god we can create the rest if we’re a skilled programmer or a group of programmers. Unity is very promising as is Panda3d. Panda3d does appear to lack the editing of models, particle and other such aspects as Unity would but when you take into account that it’s an engine that was used to create an exisitng MMO, that does kind of give it a proven track record. I can not say the same for some other engines.

Again, this is entirely just my opinion and from the research that I’ve done. Myself, well, I’ve chosen Ogre3D as my graphics engine but it’s not a game engine by any means. I just gives me a good starting point and I can build off of it for the rest of the needs.

Being as he does have the money to invest in a venture of this size, it’s very possible that he can get a higher level gaming engine that might fit every need but we all know that every engine lacks in one aspect or another.

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stodge 101 Feb 21, 2007 at 17:17
  1. Large Open Terrain (Seamless if possible, but we can programme that if we have the source.). Important to be able to place buildings on the terrain (I would assume a good scenemanager)

Panda3D doesn’t support this, or if it has terrain support, it’s very new and limited (as far as I can remember)

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cybereality 101 Feb 22, 2007 at 09:10

Batman, I was in a similar position to you with regards to the 3d engines your team was using. I originally went with Torque, but lord knows that was like the biggest mistake of my life. I can’t even begin to explain what a serious piece of work that engine is. The code in that engine is such a complete mess of hacks its unbelievable it even works. Needless to say I understand your aversion to anything Torque related. That being said I’ve recently dropped Torque and am moving over to Ogre right now. But you seem to have had some issues with Ogre. Can you explain?

I’ve done a lot of research on 3d engines, and so far, Ogre appears to be performing nicely. Ogre has something absent in many engines and that is accurate documentation. It is actively supported unlike a good 90% of the engines on the list. Of course Ogre is just a rendering engine so there are still a lot of work to do on the game framework, libraries, etc. But it seems pretty solid to me. What issues did you face with Ogre that would make you drop it and contemplate spending almost $20k on another solution?

There are a few other engines that caught my eye, Unity being one of them (why is it only for Mac?). Honestly, if Unity had an IDE for PC I would have licensed multiple seats, no problem. Sadly working on Macs in not really an option for me or my team. If you want to make money selling licenses, try targeting the good 90% of the PC market that don’t use Macs.

Another engine that look promising was Unigine ([url]http://unigine.com)[/url], however the license is pretty steep. They make it out on the website like they support indie developers, but they don’t. They are targeting the full commercial license, so don’t even bother unless you have the cash to pony up.

I’ve looked at Panda3D for years, when was the last time they updated their website? The features sound decent, but show me a nice looking demo. Sure theres Disney’s MMO, but what else? Seriously. If I go to an engines website and the frontpage hasn’t been updated in like a year, when do you think the last time they updated the actual engine was? It isn’t exactly a hard sell.

To be honest, I don’t think there is *any* engine in the open-source/low-cost/indie market that supports everything you need. If you want a serious 3d engine its either going to cost you in the 5 figures and up, or you have to code it yourself. I’ve been looking for a suitable 3d engine for years and this is the conclusion I came to.

//cybereality

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lstockman 101 Feb 22, 2007 at 19:15

@cybereality

To be honest, I don’t think there is *any* engine in the open-source/low-cost/indie market that supports everything you need. If you want a serious 3d engine its either going to cost you in the 5 figures and up, or you have to code it yourself. I’ve been looking for a suitable 3d engine for years and this is the conclusion I came to. //cybereality

You hit the nail on the head. No matter what engine is used, there will still be things that will be needed that the engine wont do. It’s really hard to find one that does everything for an MMO. I only chose two which had promise and fit “most” of the needs. Each of the problems could be overcome with coding in C++ and some time.

I use Ogre3D myself and to be honest, if you buy the book at Amazon, it does make it easier. Especially for the CEGUI methods and classes.

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Riya 101 Feb 22, 2007 at 22:07
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mr_yeahman 101 Mar 06, 2007 at 14:51

dont spend money on a gameengine if u not want any special from it and target to a fancypantsgame, otherwise pick up the best free engine that fits ur devteam and project. I would..

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TMichael 101 Mar 10, 2007 at 06:36

Take a hard look at Lawmaker, C4 (brilliant design), Unigine, and Jupiter. They are all very FPS capable.

Lawmaker has an incredibly nice toolset/art pipleline and C4 is very fast and is probably the most flexible/customizable. I only know Jupiter and Unigine from their webpage feature listings, so I have no info one way or the other about them.

Good luck,
Tim

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furiouso 101 Mar 16, 2007 at 15:53

I’m in the same situation with a small dev team, we are currently evaluating game engine options. I’ve recently came across C4 which has peaked my interests. The code is clean and efficient, the developer is readily available to answer questions, and he seems responsive to the enhancement requests of his community. I’d say it’s worth your consideration.

http://www.terathon.com/c4engine

Let me know how you fair. I’d probably be worth while to compare notes. Maybe the research both of our teams do can help us decide on the right game engine for our individual projects.

we’re at www.ithink-online.com

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furiouso 101 Mar 17, 2007 at 01:00

Since reading this thread I have looked at unigine…. very compelling.

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Errornix 101 Mar 17, 2007 at 21:07

I’ve recently been messing with Crystal Space. For a free engine, it’s about as good as you’ll get.

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DenDiesel 101 May 05, 2007 at 06:57

@furiouso

Since reading this thread I have looked at unigine…. very compelling.

If you’re still interested in Unigine, take a look at updated screenshots gallery: http://unigine.com/screenshots/

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marciano 101 May 06, 2007 at 16:39

Hello,

if you want you can have a look at Horde3D. It is a pure graphics engine but very suitable for displaying large terrains and a plenty of characters as required for a MMO, since it is heavily optimized for polygon throughput (crowd simulation is the main focus).
@Batman

  1. Large Open Terrain (Seamless if possible, but we can programme that if we have the source.). Important to be able to place buildings on the terrain (I would assume a good scenemanager)

  2. Shader Model 3 support, with strong shader support

  3. Physics (Preferably Physx, but we can add that)

  4. Clean Code Base with good design (Hence why we want to avoid Torque)

  5. Good Toolset, where artists can just get up and running, the programmers can handle most code changes if the code base is good.

1.) Horde does everything to optimize polygon throughput. Geometry data is optimized for GPU cache, linear array access and so on. Furthermore the animation system is heavily optimized.

2.) Horde is entirely based on shaders. Both SM 2.0 and 3.0 are supported. You can use all modern rendering techniques like deferred shading and all other sorts of post processing effects (HDR, DOF, Motion Blur)

3.) We are currently working on a physics integration as a proof of concept. Everything works well so far, since you get easily access to all the required data.

4.) Clean and simple code and a good OO design is one of the major design goals. Horde has just some thousand lines of well readable code which makes it pretty easy to extend and adapt the engie.

5.) By using Collada, Horde has very good compatibility with Max and Maya. We have tested it with all sorts of data modelled in Max and have no problems with morph targets and multiple skin modifiers. Unfortunately there are currently no engine specific tools available.

Probably you want a more battle proven engine but having a look doesn’t cost anything :)

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TMichael 101 May 06, 2007 at 19:39

Horde looks very nice to me, but similar to Ogre, it is just a rendering engine and other functionality would have to be added. One thing I couldn’t quite figure out was the best methodology for adding that functionality. Unlike Ogre, there seem to be no clear examples of how to do this. Also, I think the poster was looking for functionality already built in.

Based on what he asked, I still think C4, Lawmaker, or Unigine come close. C4 does especially because of its clean design.

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bobsterling 101 May 15, 2007 at 12:08

http://www.dxstudio.com/

They also provide bespoke engine mods if required!

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monkeypit 101 May 15, 2007 at 15:41

With all these small developers starting games its a shame we don’t all get together and make one game. Then again that could be a nightmare. :)

Anyways have you looked in the Torque engine. My friends and I have been looking at the demo and it has all the standard tools and has been around the longest that I know of, just may not have all the bells and whistles you are looking for, but not sure. It all depends on what you need and the style you are going for.

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Drago 101 May 15, 2007 at 19:42

What of these programms is the best for non-coder? What programm has the best editor(s)?

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bobsterling 101 May 17, 2007 at 09:57

I don’t think you will be able to get very far in making a game without any coding. DX Studio uses JavaScript which is about as simple as it gets and allows you to achieve a lot with a relatively small amount of code.

For ‘best editor’ it’s really down to personal preference so I would just try the freeware or demo versions of suggested products and see which you like using.

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Drago 101 May 17, 2007 at 12:50

Okay thanks, but I heard that Lawmaker would have the most comfortable and “best” editor… C4 would have a clean design (whatever that means) and Unigine has many editors, which get a good work flow… I dont know…

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ulaoulao 101 May 22, 2007 at 21:42

Same boat here. I have reviewed for a few years for my own project and my company as well. We are starting production on a fps game using an engine called kjapi. Only thing I can say is they support the rendering we need and they answer posts on the forum. They are actively designing and seem to be very helpfull. IMO its not the greatest engine..

I also agree with the torque comments. I read a post on here few years back about how great it was. This one fellow kept post “you will regret it in the end”, and he was questioned left and right. All he said was take my word for it. Well he was right. It is not an engine its a hack… Just had to comment…

Lawmaker seems very impressive, I hope to use this for the full development of the game. I have not used C4 but I here its amazing. Stay way from power render. It is an amazing engine with 0 support. I mean they never answer questions. I’m told that if you buy it they will help, but come now. At these prices?? let us at least review it huh? I also like quest3d, pricey but good.

As other engines..

http://www.neoaxisgroup.com/

this is built on OGRE3d. Still in the works.

http://irrlicht.sourceforge.net/downloads.html

I like this engine, has a level editor but its a bit limited for “game” functions.

I used Crystal space. A bit confusing as they have so much stuff.

Panda is horribly out of date.

3impact is a game engine. It really does have a lot of game behaver, but lacks in the rendering/shader department. version 4 is out but I have not tried it. No level editor.

http://www.trinigy.net/

is another good engine if you have the cash..

With all these small developers starting games its a shame we don’t all get together and make one game.

  • I agree… We could use OGER3d or irrlicht as they are OS and build from them. I would be game.
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DenDiesel 101 May 24, 2007 at 16:25

@Drago

Okay thanks, but I heard that Lawmaker would have the most comfortable and “best” editor… C4 would have a clean design (whatever that means) and Unigine has many editors, which get a good work flow… I dont know…

Some little corrections: we suppose that killer-features of Unigine are very clean internal design, great picture quality, built-in physics and fast scripting. Frankly speaking our weakest sides are artist-friendly tools and detailed documentation for artists, some other engines have more easy to use tools than our ones. We are doing our best to make our engine more artist-friendly, but for now things are as they are.

By the way, you can see Unigine v0.4 picture quality in our new demo: http://unigine.com/download/

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Drago 101 Jun 07, 2007 at 13:42

Yes but I think that Unigine is “a bit” too expensive… I think C4 or Lawmaker will do the race… Just my opinion. I need good graphics, ease of use tools and editors, a powerful and FLEXIBLE Engine… I dont know how flexible C4 is? More than the Lawmaker? How are the physics of C4? I dont understand this “graphic scripting”… Is it ease to use? Can I make something like a RPG? Please help me… I have to do a choice, but I dont know…

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Frank_Skilton 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 03:42

I own a license to C4 and given the fact that ALL the source code is included, which includes the engine, sample game modules and tools I would say it’s a lot more flexible than LawMaker. I don’t own a license to LawMaker nor have I ever used it however looking at their pricing structure $1499.99 is the minimum you’ll pay for what you need to release a product, and that still doesn’t give you access to the source code. From what I can tell and from what I’ve heard from others, LawMaker is great for making an fps - anything else is going to be a difficult task.

C4 is a steal at only $200 with all source included with free lifetime updates and support. The demo now includes all the tools for your evaluation. The tools recently received an overhaul and the world editor is quite nice. C4 is cross platform (Win, Mac, and PS3) whereas LawMaker appears to be Windows only, something to keep in mind.

Both engines have evaluation kits available, at the end of the day you’re the only one whom can judge which engine works best for you.

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 09:51

So when I buy the Lawmaker I only buy the name of darkroomstudios, or why is it so much more expensive than C4? Are there any features, which the Lawmaker has but the C4 not? Anything else you can tell me? Can I make a RPG or something with C4? I am no programmer, but can I work with this graphical script editor? How is working with this editor? I used 3D Gamestudio and it cost between 100 and 800 €/$… So whats bad on C4?

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Frank_Skilton 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 10:08

Well I don’t own the LawMaker engine so I can’t tell you much about it. From what I can gather, the LawMaker engine takes more of a “modding” approach in the sense that you get the framework for a working fps and simply script whatever else you need. The fact that the source code isn’t included would suggest to me that you’re pretty much stuck making an fps game. If anyone here has licensed the LawMaker engine feel free to correct me.

Who knows why engine X is $5000 and engine Y is only $100. Sometimes it’s a case of a difference in quality however this is not the case with C4. A commercial license to C4 will set you back $10, 000 - the independent license is only $200. I would speculate that this is a strategic ploy from the developers of the C4 Engine to ensure a healthy, long lasting future.

The C4 Engine takes a different approach; you receive a generic canvas to work from. The engine provides you with excellent low level systems and you write your own game code. By design, I would say that C4 is the most flexible engine I’ve worked with. You need to know how to code in C++ to effectively use C4, but man isn’t that what game making is all about? Unless you’re happy re-skinning someone else’s game module you’re going to have to be able to code in order to make a game. There are point & click solutions available but they are nowhere near as flexible and the results that can be obtained are mediocre at best.

If you’re not a coder, I can’t see how you’re going to make an RPG in any engine. Scripting will only take you so far.

If you can’t code, don’t have someone on your team who can code or are unwilling to learn how to code then I couldn’t recommend C4 to you.

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 14:07

Oh, I have a team with a few programmer! Okay, I think you helped me very much, but I am not sure… What can I do with this “commercial license”? I want to make my game commercial, must I have this license? Can you say to me anything else (from your experience) about the performance, scripting part, world editor etc. what could be helpfully for me? How many polys can I use in one scene? A very good graphic is very important for me, so maybe the Lawmaker is the better solution… If I really want to make a shooter, would you say “oh, better you buy the Lawmaker” or for a shooter C4 too?

Thank you for your help!

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Frank_Skilton 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 14:21

Regarding licensing:
@”From the C4 Website”

You only need a professional license if your publisher is a member of the Entertainment Software Association (ESA) or the Entertainment and Leisure Software Publishers Association (ELSPA). Lists of the members of these organizations can be found at the following locations.

Members of the ESA

Members of the ELSPA

So you can self publish your game or publish through any of the independent publishing portals (Garage Games, Reflexive Arcade etc) without needing a commercial license. You only need a commercial license if your publisher is listed in one of the links above.

C4 has superb rendering capabilities IMO. The demo has some clues as to its power however unfortunately it contains programmer art so its graphical prowess may not be as evident as it could be. A new demo is being worked on by an artist so hopefully that will do a better job of showcasing the engine’s capabilities.

Lawmaker looks nice too though I have no experience with it so can’t comment too much about it.

My advice is to download the C4 demo and try it out for yourself. Evaluate the tools, see the quality of your artwork once you import it into the engine and go from there. Then request an evaluation kit from Darkroom Studios, for the LawMaker engine and start making a comparison.

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 15:03

If the only topic would be the graphics, but the programmer part is important too… LUA (Lawmaker) should be very good, and C4 with C++… I cant say which language is better… Some say that LUA is powerful and flexible, other people say that C++ is the non plus ultra. What can you say to that?

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Frank_Skilton 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 15:24

Well Lua is going to allow for faster development, it just won’t run as fast or be as secure. Some C4 users have integrated various scripting languages such as Lua, AngleScript etc however I don’t know if there are any official plans for C4 to support a scripting system. I know the authors plan on extending the visual scripting system and including a textual based script system at some stage. I don’t think Eric, the lead C4 programmer, wants to box anyone in to a particular scripting language.

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 16:48

So you think C++ is better than LUA (more flexible, powerful etc.). And what is with the ease of use? I think LUA is a little easier than C++, but I dont know exactly… I am still not sure… C4 - Lawmaker, Lawmaker - C4. Or anything else? But I am looking for 3 Months for an Engine and I think C4, Lawmaker and Unigine are the best for me (very good graphics and physics, flexible, powerful, ease of use editors). And what is when I publish my game with a publisher of (for example) activison (is on the list)… Must I buy this professional license for 10.000 $? And how important is this source code? I dont know what it is…

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Reedbeta 167 Jun 08, 2007 at 18:59

IMHO it’s pointless to compare Lua and C++ in terms of flexibility/power/whatnot, since they are designed for entirely different purposes. The comparison should be between an engine with full source code (C4) and an engine that is closed source with scripting (Lawmaker).

C++ is designed to be a systems progamming language like C, so it is geared for high performance and is relatively “close to the metal”, while still allowing high-level object-oriented programming.

Lua is a scripting language designed to be embedded into another application, so it is very light-weight and small, easy to learn and write code for, highly dynamic and mutable, but the tradeoff is that performance will not match what is written in C++, although Lua uses bytecode so it is not as if it’s as slow as an interpreted language.

You use the right tool for the right job. If you use the Lawmaker engine and write Lua scripts, you’ll have an easier time of getting off the ground, but since it’s an embedded scripting language you’ll have to operate within the limits that the Lawmaker developers have set. Without the C++ source for the engine, you won’t be able to get a Lua script to do something the developers didn’t decide to make available. Depending on what they made available, this may or may not be a problem. If you use C4 and have all the source code, you’ll be able to modify anything in the engine as you see fit. It grants you more flexibility ultimately, but might be harder to work with.

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 19:46

Okay I understood, flexibility or ease of use and graphics… I think ( I believe I will make a ego shooter) for the genre shooter is Lawmaker better, but when I am going to make a new game and that is a RPG, I could get problems with the Lawmaker… I am not sure… I am no programmer, I am an artist and I dont know how good my programmers with C4 or with the lawmaker… Unigine would be the best choice, but its too expensive!

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Reedbeta 167 Jun 08, 2007 at 20:10

Maybe you should ask your programmers what they think about the engine. And try to find people who have used Lawmaker and ask them how flexible they think it is (i.e. could you make an RPG with it).

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Drago 101 Jun 08, 2007 at 20:39
  1. My programmers dont know anything about these engines. I have to find out what is the best one for our project!
  2. I know another team which is working with the lawmaker, but they only use it for a FPS… They cant say me! The pogrammers of this team say that it is very flexible, but LUA is not useful to embed new game features etc. (for example has thelawmaker no refractive effect ;( ), but how objectiv is this opinion ;)
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Reedbeta 167 Jun 09, 2007 at 05:13

I meant that since your programmers are going to be the ones…well, programming…maybe you should have them look at the features of each engine, post some questions on the engines’ forums, and so forth. They will be better able to evaluate each engine from a coding standpoint. You should ask them to form an opinion and then take their opinions into consideration when you make your decision.

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Drago 101 Jun 09, 2007 at 12:38

I think l have chosen… I will take the Lawmaker, because he has for this price the best rendering features and good editors and ease of use… I will make a FPS, so it will be a good choice. Yes, he has no souce code included and he is not so flexible because the Lawmaker uses LUA, but I ama artist and I only want to make games…

Thank you for your help!

Drago