Hello all

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Method_Six 101 Sep 14, 2006 at 10:39

First post here, as you’ll be able to see.

My situation is thus: Essentially a dropout, I slept through highschool as I had no interest or reason to learn anything I was being taught. 19 now, screwed around for the last couple of years just trying out stuff to see what I liked. Programming looks like something I could commit myself to; the interest is there, I’m not having trouble keeping myself on track.

I’ve decided after reading some posts here and on other tech forums to learn Ruby first off, then progress into C, maybe one of its varients, perhaps SQL or PHP, whatever I figure that I need to learn next… taking into account the opinions of those who know what the hell they’re doing, with a fair amount of mathematics on the side. Speaking of which, I get the feeling I’ll need to relearn most of what I should have been taught in high-school on that count, as well as a fair amount of physics.

Ideally, I’d love to work in video-games, but I understand that commercially it’s a bit of a pipe-dream, certainly in the section of Australia in which I live.

So, my questions. The ruby compiler was a no brainer to pick, the official one. I’m without internet access much of the time, however, so I’m stocking up on a crapload of online documentation, which is a complete bitch to get, frankly I don’t see why online tutorials don’t offer an easy 1 click download… I’ve got the K&R tutorial for C as well as a number of C++ tutorials.

What is the best C compiler to use for someone fully proficient with Ruby? Same for C++?

As far as you can make out, what would be the next logical step for someone who’s gotten as close to mastering Ruby as makes no difference? Would you suggest another programming language? A web language? A complete overhall of the maths involved?

Please don’t suggest doing the mathematics first, I know how my mind works. If I have no method with which to implement any of it, I’m not going to keep going on.

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dave_ 101 Sep 14, 2006 at 12:46

If you work at it you will be able to get a job in the games industry. If you can prove you talent and skills you dont have to have a degree. Make games. Thats what they want people who can make games. Most of the games industry does use C/C++

There are a few development houses in Australia, and if you get a job you can always move. Rent a place, whatever, they’ll probably help you. And since you’re young you can get a visa to plenty of places, if you’re brave enough to go further afield.
Here’s a list of companies http://www.gamesindustry.biz/directory.php?action=browse&cat=23

If you can ‘really’ program transferring skills from one language to another should be trivial. Try out python, its similar to ruby.

As for development enviroments the wiki has useful info:

http://devmaster.net/wiki/Development_setups
I personally just use Visual Studio and everywhere I’ve worked.

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geon 101 Sep 14, 2006 at 13:21

Visual Studio is what 99% of all proffessional developers use. There is a free download for the newest version, so if you have the bandwidth, it’s a simple choise.

But there are also some nice completely free ones, as code::blocks (Seems pretty neat, began using it now.), or Dev-C++ (Still buggy sometimes, and developement seems to have stopped.) Booth are a 12 MB download, so it could be more interesting for you. Make shure to pick up the SDL library and documentation if you go this way.

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Method_Six 101 Sep 15, 2006 at 03:14

@dave_

There are a few development houses in Australia, and if you get a job you can always move. Rent a place, whatever, they’ll probably help you. And since you’re young you can get a visa to plenty of places, if you’re brave enough to go further afield.
Here’s a list of companies http://www.gamesindustry.biz/directory.php?action=browse&cat=23

Oh yes, I’d definately have to move. Living in WA, there’s not a single house here. :wallbash: :happy:

Thanks for the support, yo. Visual Studio is downloading[/strike] holy moly 2.6 gig? :(

I’ll grab code::block.

I’d go with the express developers, but the laptop which I’m currently working off hasn’t got 1.3 gig to spare.

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Method_Six 101 Sep 15, 2006 at 03:37

:surprise:

Unfortunately, it’s startling complex for a complete newcomer to put together the nightly builds of code::block, and they themselves deride the latest complete version. I think I may just give up on finding a compiler for C/C++ for the moment.

dave_ mentioned python… I may just give that a twirl.